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Dr. Asem Shehabi

ashehabi@go.com.jo

NAME: ASEM ATA SHEHABI

DATE OF BIRTH: 1940, PLACE OF BIRTH : Jerusalem
NATIONALITY : Jordanian, MARITAL STATUS: Married

HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION: 1959, Jerusalem

ADDRESS : Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Jordan University, Amman, Jordan



ACADEMIC QUALIFICATIONS:

* 1972 Doctor of Science / Medical Microbiology,
University of Kiel, Germany

* 1969 Certificate in Microbiology, University of Kiel, Germany
* 1967 Diploma / Biology, University of Hamburg, Germany.

 Medical Profile

 

- Doctor of Sciences/ Medical Microbiology, University of Kiel, Germany (1972)

- Professor of Medical Microbiology, Department: Pathology-Microbiology & Forensic Medicine Faculty of Medicine, University of Jordan (1977- up-today)

-Consultant in Diagnostic Microbiology, Jordan University Hospital, Medical Laboratories(1977-2010).

- Consultant in Medical Bacteriology, Ministry of Health, Jordan ( 1993-1977)  

 

HONORS AND AWARDS

 

Received 6 times research awards to work at the following Medical Research Centers & Universities: University of Hamburg-Germany, University of Heidelberg-Germany, University of Minnesota, USA, Wake Forest-Baumann Gray Medical School, USA, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, USA, Central for Disease Control, USA (1976-2001).   

Main Research and Studies

-         Medical diagnostic of pathogenic Bacteria and Fungi, epidemiology of infectious agents, detection of bacterial toxins and virulence factors of bacteria  & Fungi and molecular mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance, 70 publications, mostly in international indexed journals.

-         Supervisor and Co-supervisor for 36 MSc thesis's at the University of Jordan  and other Jordanian Universities (2010)   .

Published books in Arabic language : 

1-      Human Pathogenic Microorganisms, 1999, Jordan Store Book, Amman, Jordan

2-      Microbes between Health & Disease, 2010,Dar-wael Publisher, Amman, Jordan 

Professional consultation and activities:

-         2001-up-today, Member and since 2008 Chairman of the committee for quality control of water, Jordan.

-         1989-1991, Chairman the Committee for medical technology training & education, Ministry of High Education Amman, Jordan

-         2007-2009, free consultant for sexually transmitted diseases WHO, Cairo, Egypt.

-         2004-up-today,Vice President of Arab Alliance for Prudent Use for Antimicrobial, Agents, Cairo, Egypt.

-         Associate editor for many national and international medical and scientific journals.

-         Writer of more than 120 public scientific articles on all aspects of infectious diseases, environment and health issues in Arabic journals and newspapers.

 

 

 

 

Main publications at PubMed

 

Human metapneumovirus in hospitalized children in Amman, Jordan.

(PMID:20419816)      

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Ali SA,

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Williams JV,

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Chen Q,

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Faori S,

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Shehabi A,

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Jundi EA,

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Khuri-Bulos N, et al.

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Journal of Medical Virology [2010, 82(6):1012-6]

Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) has recently been identified as an important cause of acute respiratory infections (ARI) in children worldwide. However, there is little systematic data on its frequency and importance as a cause of ARI in the Middle East. We conducted a viral surveillance study in children <5 years of age admitted with respiratory symptoms and/or fever at two major tertiary care hospitals in Amman, Jordan from 1/18-3/29/07. Nose and throat swabs were collected and tested for HMPV and other respiratory viruses by real-time RT-PCR. A total of 743 subjects were enrolled. Forty-four (6%) subjects were positive for HMPV, 467 (64%) were positive for RSV and 13 (1.3%) had co-infection with both HMPV and RSV. The frequency of HMPV in January, February, and March was 4.1%, 3.0%, and 11.9% respectively. Clinical features associated with HMPV infection were similar to those of other respiratory viruses, except children with HMPV were more likely to present with fever than children not infected with HMPV. Children with HMPV and RSV co-infection were administered supplemental oxygen and were admitted to the ICU more frequently than children infected with HMPV alone or RSV alone, though these differences did not reach statistical significance. We conclude that HMPV is an important cause of acute respiratory infections in children in Amman, Jordan. Longer surveillance studies are needed to better understand the seasonal epidemiology of HMPV and to assess if co-infection with HMPV and RSV leads to more severe illness. « Less

Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) has recently been identified as an important cause of acute respiratory infections (ARI) in children worldwide. However, there is little... More »

Burden of respiratory syncytial virus in hospitalized infants and young children in Amman, Jordan.

(PMID:20100116)       

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Khuri-Bulos N,

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Williams JV,

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Shehabi AA,

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Faouri S,

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Al Jundi E,

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Abushariah O,

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Chen Q, et al.

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Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases [2010, 42(5):368-74]

Acute respiratory infections (ARI) play a major role in hospitalizations in the Middle East, but the specific viral causes are unknown. We conducted prospective viral surveillance in children <5 y of age admitted with ARI and/or fever at 2 dissimilar hospitals in Amman, Jordan during peak respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) season. We collected prospective clinical and demographic data and obtained nose/throat swabs for testing for RSV by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We obtained clinical and laboratory data for 728/743 (98%) subjects enrolled. The children's median age was 4.3 months, 58.4% were males, 87% were breastfed, 4% attended day care, 67% were exposed to smokers, 7% were admitted to the intensive care unit, and 0.7% died (n = 5). Out of 728 subjects, 467 (64%) tested positive by RT-PCR for RSV. Comparing RSV-positive with RSV-negative subjects, the RSV-positive subjects had lower median age (3.6 vs 6.4 months, p < 0.001) and fewer males (55% vs 64%, p = 0.02). RSV-positive children had higher rates of oxygen use (72% vs 42%, p < 0.001), a longer hospital stay (5 vs 4 days, p = 0.001), and higher hospital charges (US$538 vs US$431, p < 0.001) than RSV-negative children. In young hospitalized Jordanian infants, the medical and financial burden of RSV was found to be high. Effective preventive measures, such as an RSV vaccine, would have a significant beneficial impact. « Less

Acute respiratory infections (ARI) play a major role in hospitalizations in the Middle East, but the specific viral causes are unknown. We conducted prospective viral... More »

 

Brucellosis presenting as myelofibrosis: first case report.

(PMID:19501533)      

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Bakri FG,

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Al-Bsoul NM,

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Magableh AY,

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Shehabi A,

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Tarawneh M,

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Al-Hadidy AM,

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Abu-Fara MA, et al.

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International Journal of Infectious Diseases : IJID : Official Publication of the International Society for Infectious Diseases [2010, 14(2):e158-60]

We describe the case of a 29-year-old woman who presented with pancytopenia and myelofibrosis. Brucella melitensis was identified in her blood. The patient recovered completely with doxycycline and rifampin. A repeat bone marrow biopsy showed hypercellularity without myelofibrosis. Bone marrow findings in cases of pancytopenia due to brucellosis reveal normocellularity, hypercellularity, hemophagocytosis, or granuloma. To our knowledge this is the first report of brucellosis causing myelofibrosis. Brucellosis should be considered as a possible cause of myelofibrosis in endemic areas. « Less

We describe the case of a 29-year-old woman who presented with pancytopenia and myelofibrosis. Brucella melitensis was identified in her blood. The patient recovered... More »

 

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Clostridium difficile infections among Jordanian adult hospitalized patients.

(PMID:19712999)      

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Nasereddin LM,

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Bakri FG,

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Shehabi AA

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American Journal of Infection Control [2009, 37(10):864-6]

This prospective study investigated the important epidemiologic aspects of Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) among Jordanian adult hospitalized patients. A total of 300 stool specimens were investigated using culture and polymerase chain reaction methods for detection of C difficile, its toxins, and fluoroquinolone resistance. C difficile-positive cultures were found in 13.7% of the patients, and 73% of the isolates carried tcdA and/or tcdB toxin genes, and all C difficile isolates were negative for binary toxin. The isolates showed moderate level of resistance to both ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin, whereas metronidazole and vancomycin were highly susceptible. This study indicates the need for early detection of CDIs and prevention of its severe disease in hospitalized patients. « Less

This prospective study investigated the important epidemiologic aspects of Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) among Jordanian adult hospitalized patients. A total... More »

 (This paper was selected from Popular Infectious Disease Register as ONE of the10 most popular published papers during the September 2009 )

 

Human rhinovirus C associated with wheezing in hospitalised children in the Middle East.

(PMID:19581125)      

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Miller EK,

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Khuri-Bulos N,

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Williams JV,

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Shehabi AA,

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Faouri S,

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Al Jundi I,

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Chen Q, et al.

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Journal of Clinical Virology : the Official Publication of the Pan American Society for Clinical Virology [2009, 46(1):85-9]

BACKGROUND: Few studies have investigated the disease burden and genetic diversity of human rhinoviruses (HRVs) in developing countries.

OBJECTIVES: To assess the burden of HRV in Amman, Jordan, and to characterise clinical differences between HRV groups.

STUDY DESIGN: We prospectively studied children <5 years, hospitalised with respiratory symptoms and/or fever in Amman, Jordan. Viruses were identified by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). VP4/VP2 gene sequencing was performed on HRV-positive specimens.

RESULTS: Of the 728 enrolled children, 266 (37%) tested positive for picornaviruses, 240 of which were HRV. Of the HRV-positive samples, 62 (26%) were of the recently identified group HRVC, 131 (55%) were HRVA and seven (3%) were HRVB. The HRVC strains clustered into at least 19 distinct genotypes. Compared with HRVA-infected children, children with HRVC were more likely to require supplemental oxygen (63% vs. 42%, p=0.007) and, when co-infections were excluded, were more likely to have wheezing (100% vs. 82%, p=0.016).

CONCLUSIONS: There is a significant burden of HRV-associated hospitalisations in young children in Jordan. Infection with the recently identified group HRVC is associated with wheezing and more severe illness. « Less

BACKGROUND: Few studies have investigated the disease burden and genetic diversity of human rhinoviruses (HRVs) in developing countries. OBJECTIVES: To assess the burden... More »

 

Common antimicrobial resistance phenotypes and genotypes of fecal Escherichia coli isolates from a single family over a 6-month period.

(PMID:19432518)      

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Al-Dweik MR,

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Shehabi AA

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Microbial Drug Resistance (Larchmont, N.Y.) [2009, 15(2):103-7]

This study investigated the antimicrobial resistance phenotypes and genotypes among fecal Escherichia coli isolates from the members of a single Jordanian family over a 6-month period. A total of 55 (51%) E. coli isolates were resistant to >2, and 21 (19%) to >3 of the 14 tested antimicrobial agents, respectively. The highest resistance rates were observed to tetracycline (42%), followed by coamoxyclav and cotrimoxazole (32%), gentamicin (31%), and nalidixic acid (27%). Sixteen out of 21 (76%) multiresistant E. coli isolates (resistant to >3 drugs) transferred most of their resistance markers in vitro to E. coli K12. Five out of the six family members were colonized with E. coli carrying one or two of the two common plasmid sizes (54.3 and 13.2 kb). Ten of these isolates (48%) were positive for class 1 integron genes and harbored four tet (A) and five tet (B) genes, respectively, but all were negative for tet (39). The genetic diversity of E. coli isolates using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR demonstrated 13 major clusters of genotype groups, and most of the isolates (63%) belonged to one genotype group. This study indicates that all six family members are colonized with fecal E. coli isolates exhibiting a common number of antimicrobial resistance phenotypes and at least one prevalent genotype. « Less

This study investigated the antimicrobial resistance phenotypes and genotypes among fecal Escherichia coli isolates from the members of a single Jordanian family over... More »

 

 

OBJECTIVE: To examine practice patterns and workload of practising Australian intensivists and to investigate the risk and prevalence of "burnout syndrome".

DESIGN AND SETTING: On-line survey was emailed to 324 intensivists listed on the database of the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society (ANZICS) and practising in Australia.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prospectively recorded workload during a specific week in October 2007, self-reported 12-weekly averaged work pattern, and prevalence of burnout syndrome assessed by modified Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey (MBI-GS).

RESULTS: 115 intensivists (36%) responded; respondents were representative of mainstream tertiary intensive care practitioners. On average in a 12-week period, intensivists spent 42% of working days in bedside patient management, 16% in administration, 11% in locum positions, 9% in research and 9% in recreational leave. During 1 week of prospective recording of actual workload, 26% of intensivists managed more than nine ventilated patients, and most admitted more than two new patients per day. Most were involved in more than two family conferences with a median duration of 1 h. The MBI-GS showed that 80% of respondents had signs of psychological stress and discomfort, 42% showed signs of emotional exhaustion, 32% had negative feelings and cynicism, and 37% considered they underachieved in terms of personal accomplishments.

CONCLUSIONS: Intensivists are at high risk of burnout syndrome. Recognising the drivers and early signs of burnout and identifying a preventive strategy is a professional priority for ANZICS and the intensive care community. « Less

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Epidemiology and clinical outcome of candidaemia among Jordanian newborns over a 10-year period.

(PMID:17852924)      

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Badran EF,

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Al Baramki JH,

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Al Shamyleh A,

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Shehabi A,

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Khuri-Bulos N

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Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases [2008, 40(2):139-44]

This retrospective study includes all newborn patients with culture proved candidaemia who were admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit of Jordan University Hospital through the period January 1995 to June 2006. Among 24 patients included, 13 (54.2%) died. The incidence of candidaemia was 0.27%, the mean age at diagnosis 25.9 d and the mean gestational age at birth 34.6 weeks. Species most frequently isolated were Candida albicans (50%) and C. krusei (20%). Previous gastrointestinal pathology was present in 41.7% of the cases. A comparison of cases due to C. albicans with those due to other species of Candida revealed no statistical differences in terms of demographic factors, age at onset of disease, mortality, clinical manifestations or risk factors. Based on our results, empirical antifungal therapy should be considered in neonates who have gastrointestinal pathology and other risk factors. « Less

This retrospective study includes all newborn patients with culture proved candidaemia who were admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit of Jordan University Hospital... More »

An analysis of therapeutic, adult antibiotic prescriptions issued by dental practitioners in Jordan.

(PMID:18063860)      

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Dar-Odeh NS,

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Abu-Hammad OA,

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Khraisat AS,

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El Maaytah MA,

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Shehabi A

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Chemotherapy [2008, 54(1):17-22]

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the therapeutic adult antibiotics prescribed by dental practitioners working in the Jordan University Hospital.

METHODS: Adult dental prescriptions for therapeutic antibiotics issued between 1 January 2003 and 31 May 2004 by dental specialists working in the Jordan University Hospital were included in this study. Data included the name of the antibiotic as well as the dose, quantity and presentation of the drug. Descriptive statistical analysis was carried out.

RESULTS: Amoxycillin and metronidazole were the most commonly prescribed antibiotics, with 60% of the prescriptions containing amoxycillin and 39.4% containing metronidazole. 20.4% of the prescriptions were combination prescriptions containing metronidazole. In this study, long courses were observed for amoxycillin (60.5%), cephalosporins (21%) and metronidazole (59.7%).

CONCLUSIONS: It seems that in the sample studied, Jordanian dental specialists have a tendency towards overprescribing antibiotics both in quantity and duration. This may constitute a problem particularly when considering the remaining sectors of less well-educated dental practitioners. The results will be used to increase awareness among dental practitioners in the field of antibiotic prescribing throughout the University of Jordan and the Jordanian Dental Association. « Less

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the therapeutic adult antibiotics prescribed by dental practitioners working in the Jordan University Hospital. METHODS:... More »

Critical Care (London, England) [2008, 12(3):211]

You are concerned about the escalating use of antibiotics in your intensive care unit (ICU). This has put a strain on the ICU budget and is possibly resulting in the emergence of resistant bacteria. You review the situation with your team and one suggestion is to consider using biomarkers such as procalcitonin to better guide appropriate antibiotic decision making. « Less

You are concerned about the escalating use of antibiotics in your intensive care unit (ICU). This has put a strain on the ICU budget and is possibly resulting in the... More »

Prevalence of putative virulence factors and antimicrobial susceptibility of Enterococcus faecalis isolates from patients with dental Diseases.

(PMID:18513445)      

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Salah R,

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Dar-Odeh N,

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Abu Hammad O,

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Shehabi AA

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BMC Oral Health [2008, 8:17]

BACKGROUND: This study investigated the prevalence of Enterococcus faecalis, its putative virulence factors and antimicrobial susceptibility in individuals with and without dental diseases. A total of 159 oral rinse specimens were collected from patients (n = 109) suffering from dental diseases and healthy controls (n = 50).

RESULTS: E. faecalis was detected using only culture in 8/109 (7.3%) of the patients with various types of dental diseases, whereas no E. faecalis was found in the healthy controls weather using both culture and PCR. Phenotype characterizations of the 8 E. faecalis isolates indicated that 25% of the isolates produced haemolysin and 37.5% produced gelatinase. Most important virulence genes; collagen binding protein (ace) and endocarditis antigen (efaA) were present in all 8 E. faecalis isolates, while haemolysin activator gene (cylA) was detected only in 25% of isolates, and all isolates were negative for esp gene. All E. faecalis isolates were 100% susceptible to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, vancomycin, and teicoplanin, and to less extent to erythromycin (62.5%).

CONCLUSION: This study shows that all E. faecalis isolates were recovered only from patients with dental diseases especially necrotic pulps, and all isolates carried both collagen binding protein and endocarditis antigen genes and highly susceptible to frequently used antimicrobial drugs in Jordan. « Less

BACKGROUND: This study investigated the prevalence of Enterococcus faecalis, its putative virulence factors and antimicrobial susceptibility in individuals with and without... More »

Incidence and characterization of diarrheal enterotoxins of fecal Bacillus cereus isolates associated with diarrhea.

(PMID:17878069)      

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Al-Khatib MS,

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Khyami-Horani H,

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Badran E,

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Shehabi AA

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Diagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease [2007, 59(4):383-7]

A total of 490 stool specimens were collected from patients with diarrhea and healthy controls without diarrhea to investigate the incidence of Bacillus cereus and its enterotoxins. B. cereus was found more significant in stools of persons with diarrhea than without diarrhea (9.5% versus 1.8%, P < 0.05), and was also detected more frequent but not significant in individuals aged > or =1 year and in adults than in children aged <1 year (11% and 8% versus 7.8%, P > 0.05). The hemolytic enterotoxin HBL genes of B. cereus isolates (hblA, hblC, hblD) were detected in 58%, 58%, and 68%, respectively, whereas the nonhemolytic enterotoxin NHE genes (nheA, nheB, nheC) were detected more frequent in 71.%, 84%, and 90% of the isolates, respectively. This study suggests that B. cereus isolates harboring 1 or more enterotoxin gene(s) can be a potential cause of diarrhea in Jordanian population. « Less

A total of 490 stool specimens were collected from patients with diarrhea and healthy controls without diarrhea to investigate the incidence of Bacillus cereus and its... More »

 

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Persistent bacteraemia due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with reduced susceptibility to vancomycin in a patient with erythrodermic psoriasis.

(PMID:17464871)      

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Bakri FG,

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Al-Hommos NA,

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Shehabi A,

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Naffa RG,

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Cui L,

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Hiramatsu K

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Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases [2007, 39(5):457-60]

A 49-y-old male with erythrodermic psoriasis developed persistent bacteraemia for 3 months due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus despite antimicrobial therapy. The skin was the likely focus. Three consecutive isolates from the blood and 1 from the nose were identical and had vancomycin MIC of 4 mg/l. « Less

A 49-y-old male with erythrodermic psoriasis developed persistent bacteraemia for 3 months due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus despite antimicrobial therapy... More »

Characterization of antimicrobial resistance and class 1 integrons found in Escherichia coli isolates from human stools and drinking water sources in Jordan.

(PMID:17127221)      

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Shehabi AA,

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Odeh JF,

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Fayyad M

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Journal of Chemotherapy (Florence, Italy) [2006, 18(5):468-72]

This study demonstrates that Escherichia coli isolates from human stools showed mostly higher minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and significant rates of resistance (32%-67%, P<0.05) than Escherichia coli water isolates in Jordan, as follows: ampicillin (67% vs 28%), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (67% vs 28%) nalidixic acid (63% vs 20%), cefuroxime (32% vs 4%), gentamicin (32% vs 17%), norfloxacin (32% vs 12%) and tetracycline (33% vs 16%). The prevalence of integron integrase genes (Intl1) in these isolates was also significantly higher in patients' stools (67%, P <0.05) than in water (36%), but the distribution of Sul 1/Sul 2 or both in association with postive Intl1 and resistance to ampicillin and sulfamethoxazole was not significantly higher (74% versus 62%, P <0.05) in isolates from stool and water. Plasmid profiles of representative multiresistant E. coli isolates from both sources indicated the presence of two common plasmids (49,25 kb) in 11/12 (91.6%), and all E. coli transconjugants were positive for class 1 integron markers (Intl 1, Sul 1 and Sul2) and mostly associated with three transferable drug-resistant determinants to ampicillin, sulfamethoxazole and tetracycline. These results indicate that class 1 integrons with conjugative R-plasmids are common and transferable among commensal antimicrobial multiresistant E. coli isolated from human feces and drinking water sources in Jordan. « Less

This study demonstrates that Escherichia coli isolates from human stools showed mostly higher minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and significant rates of resistance... More »

 

 

Enterotoxicity and genetic variation among clinical Staphylococcus aureus isolates in Jordan.

(PMID:16434711)      

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Naffa RG,

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Bdour SM,

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Migdadi HM,

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Shehabi AA

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Journal of Medical Microbiology [2006, 55(Pt 2):183-7]

A total of 100 Jordanian clinical Staphylococcus aureus isolates was analysed for the presence of the enterotoxin genes sea, seb, sec, sed and see using multiplex PCR. Twenty-three isolates (23 %) were potentially enterotoxigenic. The prevalence of sea, sec and sea plus sec among the total clinical isolates was 15, 4 and 4 %, respectively. None of the isolates harboured sed, seb or see genes. S. aureus isolates were subjected to DNA fingerprinting by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis to test whether isolates harbouring the toxin genes were genetically clustered. A total of 13 genotypes was identified at a 47 % similarity level. Genotypes I and V accounted for the largest number of enterotoxigenic isolates (19 %). This study has demonstrated the genetic diversity of Jordanian clinical S. aureus isolates and shown that the presence of the toxin genes is not genotype specific. « Less

A total of 100 Jordanian clinical Staphylococcus aureus isolates was analysed for the presence of the enterotoxin genes sea, seb, sec, sed and see using multiplex PCR... More »

Common antimicrobial resistance patterns, biotypes and serotypes found among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from patient's stools and drinking water sources in Jordan.

(PMID:15920903)      

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Shehabi AA,

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Masoud H,

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Maslamani FA

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Journal of Chemotherapy (Florence, Italy) [2005, 17(2):179-83]

Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated in low rates from stool specimens of outpatients and inpatients (7% versus 12%) but in higher rates from chlorinated and nonchlorinated water sources (15% versus 44%), respectively in Jordan. The same biotype was recognized among 90% of P. aeruginosa isolates from patient's stools and water sources using specific biochemical profiles. Three serogroups belonging to 01, 06 and 011 accounted for the majority of these isolates in water (66%) and stools (78%), respectively. All P. aeruginosa isolates from water were highly susceptible (87%-100%) to piperacillin-tazobactam, amikacin, gentamicin, imipenem, aztreonam, ceftazidime and ciprofloxacin, whereas the isolates from stool were slightly less susceptible (81%-98%) to these antimicrobials. P. aeruginosa isolates from water and stool sources were almost equally highly resistant to tetracycline (86%-89%) and carbenicillin (88%-89%), respectively. One common small plasmid (15.4 kb) was detected in 14/25 (56%) of multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates from both water and stool. This study demonstrates certain common epidemiological characteristics including antimicrobial resistance pattern, biotypes and serotypes among P. aeruginosa isolates from patient's stools and drinking water sources in Jordan. « Less

Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated in low rates from stool specimens of outpatients and inpatients (7% versus 12%) but in higher rates from chlorinated and nonchlorinated... More »

 

Heterogeneity in microbial exposure in schools in Sweden, Poland and Jordan revealed by analysis of chemical markers.

(PMID:15254476)      

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Wady L,

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Shehabi A,

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Szponar B,

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Pehrson C,

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Sheng Y,

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Larsson L

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Journal of Exposure Analysis and Environmental Epidemiology [2004, 14(4):293-9]

We used gas chromatography--tandem mass spectrometry to analyze microbial components in 85 samples of airborne dust from schools in Jordan, Sweden, and Poland. To collect the samples, we allowed dust to settle on plexiglass plates hanging in the breathing zone in school buildings during both summer and winter. In each of the three countries, we conducted such sampling in two schools: one in an urban environment and the other in rural surroundings. The microbial marker profiles differed significantly between the schools and seasons. For example, samples from Jordan contained remarkably low levels of ergosterol (marker of fungal biomass) and high levels of 3-hydroxy acids (markers of lipopolysaccharide) of 10, 12, and 14 carbon chain lengths relative to such acids of 16 and 18 carbons in comparison with samples from Sweden and Poland. This dissimilarity in 3-hydroxy fatty acid distribution indicates significant differences in the populations of Gram-negative bacteria. We also noted that muramic acid (marker of bacterial biomass) exhibited the smallest variation between schools and seasons. In summary, our results demonstrate that exposure to microorganisms in indoor air in school buildings may differ markedly between countries, between seasons, and between urban and rural environments. « Less

We used gas chromatography--tandem mass spectrometry to analyze microbial components in 85 samples of airborne dust from schools in Jordan, Sweden, and Poland. To collect... More »

Antimicrobial resistance and plasmid profiles of urinary Escherichia coli isolates from Jordanian patients.

(PMID:16212208)      

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Shehabi AA,

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Mahafzah AM,

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Al-Khalili KZ

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Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal = La Revue de Sante de la Mediterranee Orientale = Al-Majallah Al-sihhiyah Li-sharq Al-mutawassit [2004, 10(3):322-8]

We investigated antimicrobial resistance patterns and plasmid profiles of uropathogenic Escherichia coli isolates from inpatients and outpatients at Jordan University Hospital in 2000 and 2001. E. coli accounted for 32.4% and 37.4% of all isolates respectively. The lowest susceptibility was for ampicillin (11%), cotrimoxazole (23%) and tetracycline (26%). The relative incidence of resistant isolates of E. coli to nalidixic acid, gentamicin, norfloxacin, cefuroxime and nitrofurantoin was significantly greater for inpatients than for outpatients (P< 0.05). A large, transferable R-plasmid of 28 kb was found in most E. coli isolates (67%) that were resistant to at least ampicillin, cotrimoxazole and tetracycline. This R-plasmid reservoir may contribute to the spread of multiple antibiotic resistance in our Region. « Less

We investigated antimicrobial resistance patterns and plasmid profiles of uropathogenic Escherichia coli isolates from inpatients and outpatients at Jordan University... More »

 

Investigation of Burkholderia cepacia nosocomial outbreak with high fatality in patients suffering from diseases other than cystic fibrosis.

(PMID:15119360)      

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Shehabi AA,

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Abu-Al-Soud W,

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Mahafzah A,

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Khuri-Bulos N,

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Abu Khader I,

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Ouis IS,

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Wadstrφm T

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Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases [2004, 36(3):174-8]

Over a 1-y period, 26 inpatients at the Jordan University Hospital in Amman were detected with bacteraemia (23 cases) or respiratory tract colonized with B. cepacia (3 cases). A combination of genetic identification and molecular typing has proved that all cases were caused by a single epidemic strain of B. cepacia genomovar IIIa. Nosocomial infections could be documented in 21/26 (81%) patients, mostly with severe underlying or malignant diseases other than cystic fibrosis, but the source of infection was undetected. The overall mortality related to infection with B. cepacia was 42%. All B. cepacia isolates were resistant to ampicillin, amikacin, carbenicillin and gentamicin; and mostly susceptible to piperacillin, chloramphenicol, cotri-moxazole, tetracycline, ceftazidime, and tazocin (62-88%). This study demonstrates the nosocomial and high fatality of B. cepacia genomovar IIIa in Jordanian patients suffering from diseases other than cystic fibrosis. « Less

Over a 1-y period, 26 inpatients at the Jordan University Hospital in Amman were detected with bacteraemia (23 cases) or respiratory tract colonized with B. cepacia (3 cases)... More »

Antibiotic resistance patterns of mecA-positive Staphylococcus aureus isolates from clinical specimens and nasal carriage.

(PMID:15650377)      

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Al-Zu'bi E,

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Bdour S,

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Shehabi AA

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Microbial Drug Resistance (Larchmont, N.Y.) [2004, 10(4):321-4]

The present study demonstrates that the nasal carriage rate of Staphylococcus aureus was 40% in Jordanian healthy young adult population, and 19% of nasal S. aureus and 57% of clinical isolates over the same period were resistant to oxacillin (MRSA), respectively. The mecA gene was detected in all MRSA isolates in both groups. Most of MRSA isolates were multiresistant to three antibiotic classes (beta-lactams, aminoglycosides, macrolides-lincosamides). This result suggests a serious problem may be encountered in treatment of staphylococcal infections in Jordan. « Less

The present study demonstrates that the nasal carriage rate of Staphylococcus aureus was 40% in Jordanian healthy young adult population, and 19% of nasal S. aureus and... More »

Prevalence of genital chlamydial infection in symptomatic and asymptomatic Jordanian patients.

(PMID:14563224)      

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Awwad ZM,

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Al-Amarat AA,

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Shehabi AA

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International Journal of Infectious Diseases : IJID : Official Publication of the International Society for Infectious Diseases [2003, 7(3):206-9]

OBJECTIVE: To detect Chlamydia trachomatis infection among 230 patients, 130 with signs or symptoms associated with urethritis, and 100 asymptomatic patients, attending the Jordan University Hospital urology clinic.

METHODS: Routine urine examination and the leukocyte esterase test were done for each patient. C. trachomatis infection was detected using first-void urine specimens and a cryptic plasmid-based PCR technique specific for C. trachomatis.

RESULTS: The prevalence of chlamydial infection was 4.6% among symptomatic patients with urethritis. The difference in prevalence was statistically insignificant (P > 0.05) between males and females, as well as in relation to their marital status. Two-thirds of the Chlamydia-positive patients also had urine positive for leukocyte esterase.

CONCLUSION: The low prevalence of chlamydial infection in association with urethritis among Jordanian patients might be due to the conservative behavior of the Jordanian society towards free sexuality. « Less

OBJECTIVE: To detect Chlamydia trachomatis infection among 230 patients, 130 with signs or symptoms associated with urethritis, and 100 asymptomatic patients, attending... More »

Oral candidosis in patients with removable dentures.

(PMID:12801360)      

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Dar-Odeh NS,

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Shehabi AA

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Mycoses [2003, 46(5-6):187-91]

The prevalence of Candida species with and without denture-related stomatitis were evaluated in 167 Jordanian patients. The study revealed that 47 (28%) of the patients with denture-related stomatitis were colonized with Candida species (clinical group). Candida albicans was responsible for most cases of denture-related stomatitis (72%), and it was the only species capable of secreting aspartic proteinases. The study also indicated that candidal colonization was not influenced by predisposing haematological deficiencies, as both the clinical and control patient groups showed comparable haematological parameters and the differences were not significant (P > 0.05). All Candida species isolates were 100% susceptible to amphotericin B, while these isolates were less susceptible (25-75%) to fluconazole. « Less

The prevalence of Candida species with and without denture-related stomatitis were evaluated in 167 Jordanian patients. The study revealed that 47 (28%) of the patients... More »

Characterization of diarrhoeagenic Escherichia coli isolates in Jordanian children.

(PMID:12953946)      

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Shehabi AA,

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Bulos NK,

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Hajjaj KG

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Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases [2003, 35(6-7):368-71]

In a prospective study carried out among Jordanian children in Amman, a total of 73/250 (29.2%) stool specimens were positive for 1 or more diarrhoeagenic Escherichia coli strains using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction method. This study indicated that diarrhoeagenic E. coli isolates were found frequently more in stools of children with diarrhoea (34%) than without diarrhoea (23.1%), but without any significant difference (p > 0.05). The predominant diarrhoeagenic E. coli strains associated with diarrhoea were enteropathogenic E. coli (11.3%), followed by enterotoxigenic E. coli (9.8%) and enteroaggrative E. coli (9%), whereas in the control group these were 4.3%, 11.1% and 6%, respectively. Enteroinvasive E. coli strains (2.9%) were found only in stools of children with diarrhoea. This study revealed the absence of enterohaemorrhagic E. coli in both diarrhoeal and control stools, and found that diarrhoeagenic E. coli isolates were highly resistance to tetracycline (55%), co-trimoxazole (60%) and ampicillin (89%), which are commonly used antibiotics in Jordan. « Less

In a prospective study carried out among Jordanian children in Amman, a total of 73/250 (29.2%) stool specimens were positive for 1 or more diarrhoeagenic Escherichia... More »

Prevalence of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea among hospitalized Jordanian patients.

(PMID:15332775)      

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Shehabi AA,

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Abu-Ragheb HA,

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Allaham NA

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Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal = La Revue de Sante de la Mediterranee Orientale = Al-Majallah Al-sihhiyah Li-sharq Al-mutawassit [2001, 7(4-5):750-5]

We investigated stool specimens of 400 patients at Jordan University Hospital (300 patients with clinical diarrhoea and 100 controls without diarrhoea) for the presence of Clostridium difficile or its toxin. We found a 9.7% prevalence rate of C. difficile or its toxin in stools of patients with diarrhoea. The prevalence of other potential enteric pathogens, such as Salmonella spp. (2.3%), Shigella spp. (1.0%) and Entamoeba histolytica (2.7%), was significantly less. Prevalence of C. difficile or its toxin in controls was 3.0%. Toxin A was detected in 93.1% of C. difficile-associated diarrhoea cases using an enzyme immunoassay. Our study indicates that C. difficile-associated diarrhoea is mostly observed among hospitalized patients aged > or = 50 years, in association with antimicrobial treatment. « Less

We investigated stool specimens of 400 patients at Jordan University Hospital (300 patients with clinical diarrhoea and 100 controls without diarrhoea) for the presence... More »

 

Frequency of nasal and wound isolates of Staphylococcus aureus associated with TSST-1 production in Jordanian population.

(PMID:10640602)      

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Daghistani HI,

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Issa AA,

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Shehabi AA

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FEMS Immunology and Medical Microbiology [2000, 27(2):95-8]

A total of 110 Staphylococcus aureus isolates were obtained from nasal carriers and wound infections of Jordanian population. The isolates were identified by cultural and biochemical methods. The nasal carrier rate of S. aureus among individuals was 22.7%. In comparison with the nasal S. aureus isolates the wound isolates did not produce significantly more virulence factors except DNase. Toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 production was higher among the S. aureus nasal isolates (40%) as compared with the wound isolates (26%) detected by an ELISA method which proved to be uniformly more sensitive than the immunodiffusion optimal sensitivity plate (OSP) method. « Less

A total of 110 Staphylococcus aureus isolates were obtained from nasal carriers and wound infections of Jordanian population. The isolates were identified by cultural... More »

High incidence of Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolates to extended-spectrum B-lactam drugs in intensive care units.

(PMID:10744368)      

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Shehabi AA,

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Mahafzah A,

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Baadran I,

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Qadar FA,

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Dajani N

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Diagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease [2000, 36(1):53-6]

A prospective study conducted among Jordanian ICU patients in 1997 using Etest identified resistance rates among isolates of E. coli (25%-44%), Enterobacter spp. (54%-62%), and Klebsiella spp. (30%-80%) to extended-spectrum B-lactams (ESBLs): ceftazidime, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, and aztreonam. All these isolates were susceptible to imipenem and showed low resistance rate to ciprofloxacin (5%-19%) and amikacin (13%-18%). Higher and significant resistance rates of Klebsiella isolates to ceftazidime (80%) and aztreonam (65%) were observed in 1997 compared with a previous study performed in 1994. The majority of Klebsiella pneumoniae (70%) express different ESBL phenotypes that were almost resistant to aztreonam and ceftazidime but susceptible or resistant to cefotaxime and/or ceftriaxone. This prospective study strongly suggests that ESBL production of Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates have been highly disseminated among ICU patients during 1997. « Less

A prospective study conducted among Jordanian ICU patients in 1997 using Etest identified resistance rates among isolates of E. coli (25%-44%), Enterobacter spp. (54%-62%),... More »

Multifactorial modelling for caries prediction in Jordanian university students.

(PMID:9225539)      

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Sayegh A,

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Shehabi A,

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Hilow H

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Community Dental Health [1997, 14(2):97-101]

OBJECTIVE: To construct a prediction model for caries experience in Jordanian university students using a number of explanatory risk factors as predictors.

DESIGN: Data on salivary flow rate, buffering capacity, streptococci and lactobacilli counts, plaque accumulation, oral hygiene and between meal sugar intakes were tested as predictors of clinically and radiographically registered DMFS: Methods of analysis included correlation, then multiple regression, and finally dichotomisation of the DMFS data and application of discriminant analysis and logistic regression. The latter analyses were conducted in order to predict in which caries risk group an individual belonged rather than predicting (as with regression) their actual caries status. Two dichotomisation schemes were investigated; dichotomisation at the mean and at the 75th percentile.

SETTING: The University of Jordan.

PARTICIPANTS: A random sample of 180 university students (77 male and 103 female).

OUTCOME MEASURES: Relationships were expressed as correlation coefficients, R2, and sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of the predictors, and also their validity and efficiency.

RESULTS: The highest correlation coefficient achieved was 0.43 (P < 0.0001) between sugar-containing snack intakes and DMFS. The predicted power of the fitted multiple regression model was low R2 = 0.38). Logistic regression with the DMFS data dichotomised at the 75th percentile indicated that the fitted caries model correctly identified 76 per cent of the subjects. Sensitivity and specificity values of the predictive battery were 80 per cent and 75 per cent respectively.

CONCLUSIONS: The multifactorial aetiology of caries remains unclear and requires further research. In the meantime, well-documented preventive measures should be implemented for this and similar populations. « Less

OBJECTIVE: To construct a prediction model for caries experience in Jordanian university students using a number of explanatory risk factors as predictors. DESIGN: Data... More »

 

Extra-intestinal infections with multiply drug-resistant Salmonella typhimurium in hospitalized patients in Jordan.

(PMID:7556236)      

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Shehabi AA

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European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases : Official Publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology [1995, 14(5):448-51]

During the 12-year period from 1978 to 1989, Salmonella typhimurium was the most frequently isolated serotype (592/1,500; 39.5%) among all clinical Salmonella isolates at Jordan University Hospital. Extra-intestinal infections due to Salmonella typhimurium accounted for 68 (11.5%) isolates. A high percentage of Salmonella typhimurium strains (52-90%) were resistant to commonly used drugs in Jordan. Most of the antibiotic-resistant strains of Salmonella typhimurium (10/12) examined which were from extra-intestinal sources contained a large plasmid (55 MDa) in addition to two to four small plasmids. These strains were also able to transfer most or part of their drug resistance in vitro. It is concluded that the invasive potential of Salmonella typhimurium isolates is probably associated with the presence of a large virulence plasmid and multiple antibiotic resistance. « Less

During the 12-year period from 1978 to 1989, Salmonella typhimurium was the most frequently isolated serotype (592/1,500; 39.5%) among all clinical Salmonella isolates... More »

Foodhandler-associated Salmonella outbreak in a university hospital despite routine surveillance cultures of kitchen employees.

(PMID:8077642)      

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Khuri-Bulos NA,

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Abu Khalaf M,

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Shehabi A,

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Shami K

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Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology : the Official Journal of the Society of Hospital Epidemiologists of America [1994, 15(5):311-4]

OBJECTIVE: To describe an outbreak of salmonella food poisoning that probably was due to contamination of mashed potatoes by a foodhandler, which occurred despite a policy for routine surveillance stool cultures of kitchen employees.

DESIGN: A case control study of 223 individuals who ate the lunch meal on September 23, 1989, at the Jordan University Hospital (JUH) cafeteria.

SETTING: Tertiary care university hospital in Amman, the capital of Jordan.

PATIENTS: Individuals who developed loose stool or vomiting 6 to 72 hours after eating the lunch meal of September 23, 1989, at the JUH cafeteria.

RESULTS: Of 619 individuals, 183 fit the case definition (attack rate, 19.6%); 150 were employees, 26 were inpatients, and seven were visitors. Twelve other employees became sick 4 to 6 days later and probably were infected secondarily. The incubation period ranged from 16 to 72 hours in 183 instances. Symptoms included diarrhea (88%), fever (71%), abdominal pain (74%), dehydration (34%), and bloody stool (5%). Eighty-four were hospitalized. Cultures of eight food items were negative, but stool culture on 90 of 180 patients and 11 of 61 kitchen employees yielded Salmonella enteritidis group D. A cohort study of 223 individuals revealed a food-specific attack rate of 72% for the steak and potato meal and 18% for the rice and meat meal (RR, 4; CI95, 2.62 to 6.24; P < 0.01). Stratified analysis of the steak and potato meal revealed that the potatoes were implicated most strongly (RR, 1.93; CI95, 1.42 to 2.64; P < 0.01). Cultures were obtained from all kitchen employees, and 11 of 61 grew Salmonella enteritidis group D. One asymptomatic, culture-positive employee prepared the mashed potatoes on September 23. All of these employees had negative stool cultures 3 months earlier.

CONCLUSION: This outbreak probably was caused by massive contamination of mashed potatoes by the contaminated hands of the foodhandler. Routine stool culture of foodhandlers is not cost-effective and should not be used as a substitute for health education and proper hygienic practices. « Less

OBJECTIVE: To describe an outbreak of salmonella food poisoning that probably was due to contamination of mashed potatoes by a foodhandler, which occurred despite a policy... More »

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Prevalence of Salmonella, Shigella and intestinal parasites in food handlers in Irbid, Jordan.

(PMID:2081882)      

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al-Lahham AB,

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Abu-Saud M,

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Shehabi AA

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Journal of Diarrhoeal Diseases Research [1990, 8(4):160-2]

During a one-year period, 283 food handlers in Irbid, Jordan were investigated for the presence of potential enteropathogens in their stools. The prevalence rate of enteropathogens among non-Jordanian food handlers (48.0%) was significantly higher (p less than 0.05) than that of the Jordanian group (12.3%). The isolation rates of Salmonella and Shigella were 6% and 1.4% respectively. Multi-drug resistance was frequent among isolates of Salmonella group B and Shigella spp. Intestinal parasites detected in the stools of food handlers included Ascaris lumbricoides (4.9%), Giardia lamblia (3.9%), Schistosoma mansoni, (2.8%), hookworms 2.5%, Hymenolyepis nana (1.8%), Trichuris trichiura (1.1%), Entamoeba histolytica (0.7%), and Taenia saginata (0.4%). This study emphasises the importance of food handlers, particularly the non-Jordanians, in Jordan, as potential source of food-borne infection. « Less

During a one-year period, 283 food handlers in Irbid, Jordan were investigated for the presence of potential enteropathogens in their stools. The prevalence rate of enteropathogens... More »

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Diagnosis and treatment of 106 cases of human brucellosis.

(PMID:2299182)      

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Shehabi A,

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Shakir K,

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el-Khateeb M,

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Qubain H,

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Fararjeh N,

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Shamat AR

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The Journal of Infection [1990, 20(1):5-10]

During the year 1987, 106 cases of human brucellosis were studied prospectively at the Jordan University Hospital. The disease was more often diagnosed among adults (73.6%) than children (26.4%). Serious clinical complications were observed in 5.7% patients. An initial Brucella antibody titre greater than or equal to 160 proved to be reliable in confirming suspected cases of acute and subacute brucellosis. Culture of blood was found to be more sensitive (44.4%) and significant (P less than 0.02) than bone marrow culture (27.7%) for detecting Brucella melitensis. All patients treated with rifampicin plus tetracycline or co-trimoxazole were considered to be clinically cured by disappearance of all major clinical features of brucellosis. By contrast, 2/10 patients treated with rifampicin alone, as well as 1/56 patients treated with tetracycline and streptomycin, clinically relapsed. It is evident from this study that the treatment with rifampicin alone is not as effective in brucellosis as it is when given with another appropriate drug. « Less

During the year 1987, 106 cases of human brucellosis were studied prospectively at the Jordan University Hospital. The disease was more often diagnosed among adults (73... More »

The changing epidemiology of diphtheria in Jordan.

(PMID:3260143) 

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Khuri-Bulos N,

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Hamzah Y,

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Sammerrai SM,

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Shehabi A,

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Hamed R,

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Arnaout MA,

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Turk J, et al.

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Bulletin of the World Health Organization [1988, 66(1):65-8]

Virulence mechanisms associated with clinical isolates of non-O1 Vibrio cholerae.

(PMID:3739461)      

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Shehabi AA,

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Drexler H,

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Richardson SH

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Zentralblatt fur Bakteriologie, Mikrobiologie, und Hygiene. Series A, Medical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases, Virology, Parasitology [1986, 261(2):232-9]

Twenty one isolates of non-O1 V. cholerae from patients with diarrheal illness were examined for the presence of potential virulence mechanisms. The motile strains (90%) produced cell-associated mannose-sensitive hemagglutinins which reacted with human group O, chicken, sheep and rabbit erythrocytes. Motile isolates also attached to embryonic intestinal epithelial cells (ATCC 407), and the adherence was not inhibited by the presence of 1% D-mannose. All vibrio isolates hemolyzed sheep erythrocytes. Three vibrio isolates (14%) harbored two or three plasmids which ranged in size between 1.7 and 5.2 megadaltons. The presence of the plasmid did not correlate with the presence of hemolysin, hemagglutinins, adhesions or antibiotic resistance in any of the isolates. Thus, it appears that multiple factors associated with bacterial cell surfaces influence adhesin and apparently pathogenic potential of the non-O1 vibrio isolates in the host intestine. « Less

Twenty one isolates of non-O1 V. cholerae from patients with diarrheal illness were examined for the presence of potential virulence mechanisms. The motile strains (90%)... More »

A recent survey of tinea capitis in Jordanian children.

(PMID:3726980)      

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Shehabi A,

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Arda H,

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Sharaf M,

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Damin J

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Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene [1986, 80(1):163-4]

Enterotoxigenicity of clinical isolates of non-O1 Vibrio cholerae.

(PMID:3911661)      

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Shehabi AA,

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Richardson SH

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Zentralblatt fur Bakteriologie, Mikrobiologie, und Hygiene. Series A, Medical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases, Virology, Parasitology [1985, 260(3):311-8]

Whole cultures, but not culture supernatant fluids, of 21 isolates of non-O1 V. cholerae from patients with diarrhea were shown to induce positive fluid accumulation in infant mice. CHO cell assays demonstrated the elaboration of heat-labile cytotonic, cytotoxic or both factors from most isolates when grown under optimal culture conditions. These factors were not neutralized by anti-cholera toxin serum. Also genetic studies performed on 9 vibrio isolates using a DNA hybridization probe failed to detect gene sequences homologous with cholera toxin. ELISA assays recognized six isolates which produced a cell-associated substance which immunologically cross-reacted with cholera toxin. Enzymatic profiles of the vibrio isolates did not correlate with the production of any toxic factor. The results indicate that mainly heat-labile and cell-associated cytotonic and cytotoxic factors appear to influence the enterotoxigenic potential of this heterogenous group of non-O1 vibrios. « Less

Whole cultures, but not culture supernatant fluids, of 21 isolates of non-O1 V. cholerae from patients with diarrhea were shown to induce positive fluid accumulation... More »

Bacteriology and composition of infected stones.

(PMID:6836819)      

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Dajani AM,

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Shehabi AA

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Urology [1983, 21(4):351-3]

One hundred forty-two stones from 106 male and 36 female patients were investigated bacteriologically and chemically. Twenty (14%) of these stones were infected; 65 per cent were associated with infected urine. In 45 per cent of these infected stones an identical bacteria species was isolated from urine and stone of the same patient. Most of the infected stones were of the oxalate type (II), followed by uric acid/urate (5) and calcium phosphate (4) types. Only one stone grew a definite urea-splitting organism. « Less

One hundred forty-two stones from 106 male and 36 female patients were investigated bacteriologically and chemically. Twenty (14%) of these stones were infected; 65 per... More »

The value of a single Widal test in the diagnosis of acute typhoid fever.

(PMID:7281209)      

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Shehabi AA

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Tropical and Geographical Medicine [1981, 33(2):113-6]

During an outbreak of typhoid fever in A1-Salt town, Jordan a study was made to correlate patient's positive blood culture for Salmonella typhi with a single Widal agglutination test during the acute stage of the disease. 24/26 (92%) of the patients with positive blood culture developed TO, TH or both agglutinin titres of 1/80 and more. This study indicates that a single Widal test is probably highly diagnostic in acute cases of typhoid fever. « Less

During an outbreak of typhoid fever in A1-Salt town, Jordan a study was made to correlate patient's positive blood culture for Salmonella typhi with a single Widal agglutination... 

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الكتب والمقالات العلمية المنشورة باللغة العربية / د. عاصم عطا الشهابي- كلية الطب/الجامعة الأردنية- عمان-الأردن :

2.1 كتاب الميكروبات المعدية للإنسان، عدد الصفحات 547، سنة النشر 1998
الناشر : مركز الكتاب الاردني -عمان ،
2.2 كتاب الميكروبات بين الصحة والمرض، عدد الصفحات 330، سنة النشر 2010
الناشر: دار وائل للنشر –عمان،
3.2 مقالات منشورة في مجلات وصحف عربية

1. اسهالات المسافرين، المجلة الثقافية / الجامعة الأردنية، العدد ، صفحة 334-33712 -العدد13/1987 ،
2. البكتيريا تتحدى المضادات الحيوية، مجلة آفاق علمية، العدد ، صفحة 30-32، العدد 12/1987
3. أمراض السلمونيلا، مجلة آفاق علمية، صفحة 42-44،العدد 22/1989
4. عودة انتشار مرض التدرن الرئوي ، المجلة الثقافية / الجامعة الأردنية ، 303-306العدد 32/1994
5. الجراثيم وجسم الإنسان ، المجلة الثقافية / الجامعة الأردنية ، 278-283، العدد 34/1995
6. دعونا نسوق دعم البحث العلمي ، المجلة الثقافية / الجامعة الأردنية، 104-106،36/1995
7. أصول وأبعاد مرض جنون البقر ، المجلة الثقافية ، الجامعة الأردنية ،214-218، العدد 38/1996
8. ،
9. أحذروا الأمراض التناسلية ، المجلة الثقافية / الجامعة الأردنية ، العدد 41/ 1997 ، صفحة 520-529
10. عطش البشر وتلوث مياه الشرب، المجلة الثقافية / الجامعة الاردنية ، العدد 44-45/ 1998، صفحة 356-361
11. العدوى ببكتيريا بسيدوموناس بين مرضى المستشفيات، مجلة الشفاء /مستشفى الجامعة الاردنية، العدد 2 /2000، صفحة34-35
12. ترشيد استخدام المضادات الحيوية مسؤولية الجميع ، مجلة الشفاء/ مستشفى الجامعة الاردنية، العدد 3/2000، صفحة 37-38، وجريدة الرأي 1/7/2000
13. فيروسات الحمى النزفية والنيل الأزرق وحمى الوادي المتصدع ، النشرة الصحية الاردنية/ الجامعة الاردنية ، صفحة 75- 80، العدد 3/2000،
14. مستقبل إستعمال المضادات الميكروبية في خطر- جريدة الرأي الاردنية، 10/7/2004
15. معلومات تهمك للتعامل السليم مع الزكام والأنفلونزا – جريدة الرأي الاردنية-24 /11/2004
16. ملاحظلات حول مرض التيفوئيد- - جريدة الرأي الاردنية- 23/12/2004
17. أحذروا الزكام والأنفلونزا – أنباء الجامعة الاردنية- العدد 245- 2004
18. حمى الضنك تزداد انتشارا وخطورة في العالم – جريدة الرأي الأردنية -25/5/2005
19. مرض أنفلونزا الطيور .. الخطر الداهم للبشر - جريدة الرأي الاردنية -14 تشرين أول 2005 ، ومجلة أنباء الجامعة الأردنية – العدد 248/2005
20. الأطعمة المحوره وراثيا- جريدة الرأي الاردنية 1/06/2005
21. التلوث الغذائي بالسلمونيلا - جريدة الرأي الاردنية 5/9/2006
22. التعقيم الصحيح يمنع نقل العدوى- جريدة الرأي الاردنية-25/11/2006
22 . مستقبل المضادات الميكروبية في خطر- جريدة الرأي الاردنية-02/06/2006
23 . البحث العلمي والتحدي الكبير للجامعات الاردنية - جريدة الرأي الاردنية-16/05/2007
24. التداوي بالأعشاب والنباتات الطبية- جريدة الرأي الاردنية-31/08/2007
25. تطوير القبول في الدراسات العليا- جريدة الرأي الأردنية- 7-11-2007
26. تلوت الأغذية والمياه- مجلة جامعة اليرموك- العدد 39-2007
26. التوعية الصحية تمنع التسمم الغذائي- جريدة الرأي- 28-12-2007
27. التسمم الغذائي بالميكروبات المعدية- مجلة الشفاء / مستشفى الجامعة الأردنية-العدد1-2007
28. دعم البحث العلمي حاجة وطنية - جريدة الرأي الأردنية-12-01-2008
29. الفيتامينات بين الفائدة والضرر- جريدة الرأي الأردنية-30-04-2008 30
30. خطورة أنتشار بكتيريا مرض السل المقاومة للأدوية المتعددة-- مجلة الشفاء / مستشفى الجامعة الأردنية-العدد2-2008
31. ماذا يقصد بالأمن البيولوجي -جريدة الرأي-13-5-2008
32. تأثير التغيرات المناخية على أنتشار الأمراض المعدية- جريدة الرأي الأردنية 6 /10/2008
33. صحتك مع فتامين سي – جريدة الرأي الأردنية-18-10-2008
-34 التغيرات المناخية تزيد انتشار الأمراض الميكروبية – جريدة الغد الأردنية-9-4-2009
35. تأثير التغيرات المناخية على مناعة الجهاز التنفسي- جريدة الغد الأردنية-11-4-2009
36. .الالتهابات الحادة أو الخفية تسبب رائحة كريهة للفم- جريدة الغد الاردنية - 28-4-2009
37.إنلونزا الخنازير وباء يهدد ملاين البشر- جريدة الغد الاردنية 9-4-2009
38. أهمية بكتيريا القولون لصحة الإنسان- جريدة الغد الأردنية - 6-5-2009
39. العلاج بالبكتيريا المفيدة كمضافات غذائية- جريدة الغد الاردنية - 8-05-2009
39. بكتيريا القولون أحد أهم مسببات الأمراض عند الشر والحيوان- جريدة الاردنية - 14-5- 2009
40. المواد الكيميائية في الشامبو تؤثر عاى نمو ونشاط البكتيريا- جريدة الغد الاردنية - 27-05-2009
41. فيتامين "د" يقلل خطر العدوى بفيروسات التهابات الجهاز التنفسي-جريدة الغد الأردنية- 30-5-2009
42. تأثير المطهرات على صحة الإنسان – جريدة الغد الأردنية -03-06-2009
43. تكنولوجيا النانو الطبية-مجلة الشفاء –مستشفى الجامعة الاردنية-حزيران-2009
44. - مرض الليشمانيا- جريدة الغد الاردنية -09-6-06-2009
45. أهمية التصدى لأنتشار الأمراض التناسلية- جريدة الغد الاردنية - 15-06-2009
46. إجراءات تحد من أنتشار إنفلونزا الخنازير- جريدة الغد الاردنية -20-6-2009
سعة 47. انتشار "السلمونيلا" وسهولة انتقالها من أسباب كثرة حالات التسمم الغذائي –جريدة الغد الأردنية-10-07-
2009
48. مستقبل استعمال البكتيريا المفيدة كمضادات غذائية – مجلة العربي- تموز 2009
49. لا تغب طويلا عن القدس، المجلة الثقافية للجامعة الأردنية، عمان- العدد 76، 2009
50 . حقائق حول علاج التهابات الجلد و الجروح بالعسل – جريدة الغد الأردنية- 19-8-2009
51 .التأخر في اكتشاف المريض المصاب بالسل الرئوي يهدد بانتشار المرض- جريدة الغد الأردنية 14-9-2009
52. خبراء يدعون لترشيد استخدام المضادات الميكروبية – جريدة الغد الأردنية 17-11-2009
53 . نوعية الغذاء و تراكم بقايا الطعام تسهم في زيادة تسوس الأسنان – جريدة الغد الأردنية 2-12-2009
54 . بكتيريا هليوباكتر أكثر مسببات قرحة المعدة و الأثنى عشر- جريدة الغد الأردنية -6-12-2009
55. تغيرات الطقس والهواء الملوث يزيدان من الإصابة بأمراض الجهاز التنفسي- جريدة الغد الأردنية-22-12-2009
56. تأثير التداوي بالأعشاب والنباتات الطبية على الميكروبات المعدية للإنسان- جريدة الغد الأردنية-9-1-2010
58. مخاطر الأمراض التناسلية الخفية- جريدة الغد الأردنية،13-1-2010
59. مائة سلالة من فيروس البابيلوما وراء الإصابة بالتآليل- جريدة الغد الأردنية،19-1-2010
60. آفات الجلد الفطرية لا تزال تصيب ملايين الأفراد- جريدة الغد الأردنية،27-1-2010


 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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